TCF440540/BordwellThompson/Cinematography (Discussion)

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  1. Group 3: What is depth of field?
    • Define these terms and provides examples of when these techniques might be used:
      • Shallow focus
      • Deep focus
      • Pulling focus (What's another name for it?)
  2. Group 4: What is focal length?
    • Define these focal-length terms and provides examples of when these techniques might be used:
      • Wide angle
      • Telephoto
      • Variable focal length lens (what's another, more common name for it?)
  3. Group 1: What is aspect ratio?
    • Define these terms
      • Academy Ratio: 1.33 : 1 or 4 : 3
      • Widescreen
        • Anamorphic 2.35 or 2.4 : 1
        • Masked 1.85 : 1
        • TV widescreen: 16 : 9 or 1.78 : 1
    • What are the aspect ratios of Ordinary People, Shakespeare in Love and Monster's Ball?
  4. Group 2: What do B/T mean by the "mobile frame"?
    • Explain the differences among these types of mobile frames and provides examples of when these techniques are used in the Shakespeare in Love clip:
      • Pan
      • Tilt
      • Handheld
      • Tracking or dolly shot
    • Explain the difference between a tracking/dolly shot and a zoom.

Cinematography and narrative

All groups:

In the Monster's Ball scene we viewed, what narrative functions does the cinematography serve? List three of them. Be sure to consider deep/shallow focus, focus shifts and framing in the third shot.

Shot three from the Monster's Ball scene begins.


Shot three from the Monster's Ball scene continues.


Bibliography

  1. David Bordwell and Kristin Thompson, Film Art: An Introduction, 9th ed. (New York: McGraw-Hill, 2010).

External links

  1. Cinematography illustrations
  2. Monster's Ball frame grabs